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FAFSA

 

Editor's Picks for FAFSA

Elaine Rubin
Understand how and when to file the FAFSA, and get answers to the most common questions students and parents encounter when applying for federal financial aid.
Street sign with Deadline Ahead written on it
Elaine Rubin

FAFSA Deadlines for 2022-2023

Updated on
There are several deadlines that may be applicable to FAFSA filers in order to get the most possible aid. These deadlines include, federal, state, and school deadlines. The most important deadline is the one with the earliest date.
Female graduate standing next to her mom
Elaine Rubin
If the FAFSA determines you are a dependent undergraduate student, you will need to provide one or both of your parent(s)’ information on the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
Understanding how assets are assessed when filling out the FAFSA and minimizing their impact.

Most Popular FAFSA Articles

Elaine Rubin
Learn about IRS requirements for filing as Head of Household and how to avoid common errors that can affect a student’s college financial aid.
Elaine Rubin

FAFSA at Any Income Level

Updated on
Some wealthy parents ask whether it is worthwhile to apply for financial aid if they earn a high income. Every student should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) every year, even if he or she did not receive any other types of aid during the previous year.
Elaine Rubin

Expected Family Contribution

Updated on
Expected family contribution is an index that determines how much financial aid you are eligible for. It’s important to understand what it is and how it effects how much you need to pay for college.
 

FAFSA Application

Elaine Rubin

FAFSA Deadlines for 2022-2023

Updated on
There are several deadlines that may be applicable to FAFSA filers in order to get the most possible aid. These deadlines include, federal, state, and school deadlines. The most important deadline is the one with the earliest date.
Elaine Rubin

FAFSA School Codes

Updated on
Federal School Codes are six-character alphanumeric codes that uniquely identify colleges and universities, you can look up the school code by just completing an electronic version on the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
Understand how and when to file the FAFSA, and get answers to the most common questions students and parents encounter when applying for federal financial aid.

FASFA Tips & Advice

Elaine Rubin

Expected Family Contribution

Updated on
Expected family contribution is an index that determines how much financial aid you are eligible for. It’s important to understand what it is and how it effects how much you need to pay for college.
Elaine Rubin

FAFSA at Any Income Level

Updated on
Some wealthy parents ask whether it is worthwhile to apply for financial aid if they earn a high income. Every student should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) every year, even if he or she did not receive any other types of aid during the previous year.
Elaine Rubin
FAFSA questions answered! Quick simple answers to the most common questions asked about the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
If you did not receive enough financial aid, you can file an appeal. An appeal allows you to request an increase in financial aid. To file an appeal, you will first need to contact the financial aid office for your school.
Elaine Rubin
Financial aid is money in the form of loans, scholarships, and grants that can help you pay for college. The most important action you can take when applying for financial aid is to file the FAFSA.

What Students Need to Know

Elaine Rubin
When you file the FAFSA you will either file as a dependent or independent student. Here's how to figure out your dependency status when it comes to filing the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
Wondering if you are eligible for financial aid, if filling out the FAFSA will be helpful or not? We explain eligibility requirements for receiving financial aid.
Elaine Rubin
When filing the FAFSA you will need to provide certain financial information, including income and tax information. Dependent students will also need to provide financial information for one or both parents depending on household status.

What Parents Need to Know

Elaine Rubin
Learn about IRS requirements for filing as Head of Household and how to avoid common errors that can affect a student’s college financial aid.
Elaine Rubin
Understanding how assets are assessed when filling out the FAFSA and minimizing their impact.
Elaine Rubin
If the FAFSA determines you are a dependent undergraduate student, you will need to provide one or both of your parent(s)’ information on the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
The most important financial question you’ll be asked on the FAFSA: What is your income? Learn how income affects your eligibility for financial aid — and how to potentially lower the impact.

FAFSA

The information provided on the FAFSA is used by a school to assess a student’s financial need and to determine their eligible for federal student aid.

Parents are sometimes unwilling to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and/or other financial aid forms. But, parental information is required on the FAFSA of a dependent student, so a dependent student will not be able to qualify for need-based federal student aid without his or her parent’s help. There are many reasons why a parent may be unwilling to complete the FAFSA.

Some students will file the FAFSA, but won’t qualify for need-based student aid such as grants, scholarships that require financial need, and subsidized federal student loans. For example, more than half of undergraduate students who file the FAFSA don’t qualify for a Federal Pell Grant or other federal grants. But you do have options if you didn’t receive any need-based aid.

Check to see if your school participates in federal student aid. If you they do, you will likely need to complete the FAFSA. There are some basic eligibility criteria you need to meet to qualify to receive federal aid. Eligibility requirements include:...

The FAFSA application is used to determine a student’s eligibility for federal student aid, it’s free to complete and submit. Based on the information provided on the FAFSA, you may be offered a federal student loan, if accepted, you will have to repay the loan.

You don’t claim “dependents” on the FAFSA. The FAFSA will ask you to verify household size and the rules for who is in your household are far different than the tax rules used by the IRS to determine a dependent for tax purposes.