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Federal Student Loans

 

Featured Resources

Elaine Rubin
FAFSA questions answered! Quick simple answers to the most common questions asked about the FAFSA.
Blue and Green piggy bank each atop it's own stack of coins
Elaine Rubin
The federal student loan program offers a variety of options. It can seem overwhelming, and tricky to navigate, but it doesn't have to be. Learn more about your options and compare the loans to find out which one is right for you.
Piggy bank wearing graduation cap with cash and coins in front
Elaine Rubin
Get your federal undergraduate student loan questions answered with our complete guide!
Mollie Allen
First, start by filing the FAFSA to apply for federal student loans. There are thousands of scholarships and grants available for graduate students as well.

Most Popular Articles

Elaine Rubin
Most student loans have limits that affect how much you can borrow. Learn about the limits for Direct, Perkins, PLUS, consolidation, and private loans.
Elaine Rubin

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

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Direct Unsubsidized Loans are federal student loans available to undergraduate and graduate students. Learn more about eligibility, interest rates, and how to apply.
Anita Thomas
Health professions student loans are need-based, government loans that come with service requirements and loan limits. There are four kinds of health professions loans.
 

How Financial Aid Works

Ainsley Rindfleisch
Wondering how to get a student loan? The first step is to fill out the FAFSA.
Elaine Rubin
Interest rates on Direct Loans are fixed. Undergraduates receive lower interest rates than graduate students. Find current interest rates and fees for Direct Loans.
Elaine Rubin

Student Loans for College 2022

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There are two main types of student loans for college. Federal student loans offered by the federal government, and private student loans. Get straight answers on how they work and which one may be best for you.

What are Federal Student Loans

Elaine Rubin
The federal student loan program offers a variety of options. It can seem overwhelming, and tricky to navigate, but it doesn't have to be. Learn more about your options and compare the loans to find out which one is right for you.
Elaine Rubin
Most student loans have limits that affect how much you can borrow. Learn about the limits for Direct, Perkins, PLUS, consolidation, and private loans.
Elaine Rubin
Review the pros and cons of Parent PLUS Loans to private student loans. Comparison chart included.

Several lenders offer private loans specifically for the parents of college students. Learn more about the costs and benefits of Private Parent Loans.

Elaine Rubin
Learn how who is eligible to borrow a Parent PLUS Loan, what to consider, and how to apply.

Undergraduate Loans

Tre Norman

How to Pay for Community College

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One of the benefits of community college is its affordability. Here are 8 different ways you can pay for community college, 6 of which do not require student loans.
Elaine Rubin

Direct Subsidized Loans

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Get the details on the Direct Subsidized Loan program, including eligibility, interest rates and how to apply.
Elaine Rubin

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

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Direct Unsubsidized Loans are federal student loans available to undergraduate and graduate students. Learn more about eligibility, interest rates, and how to apply.
Elaine Rubin
Get your federal undergraduate student loan questions answered with our complete guide!

Graduate Loans

Mollie Allen
First, start by filing the FAFSA to apply for federal student loans. There are thousands of scholarships and grants available for graduate students as well.
Anita Thomas
Health professions student loans are need-based, government loans that come with service requirements and loan limits. There are four kinds of health professions loans.
Mollie Allen

Bar Exam and Bar Prep Loans

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Why should you apply for a bar loan? Bar exam and bar prep loans cover the costs of exam prep, the bar exam itself, and living expenses while you are preparing to take the bar.
Anita Thomas
Residency and relocation loans help dental school students and graduates pay for the cost of preparing for dental boards and relocating for a residency.
Elaine Rubin

How to Pay for Law School

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There are options to help pay for law school such as scholarships, grants, federal and private student loans. We explain these options so you can determine how you will pay for law school.
Elaine Rubin

How to Pay for Medical School

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Medical students can find scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships to help pay for school. Savings may be an option, but loans are often needed. Start with federal student loans then look for competitive private loans.
Elaine Rubin

How to Pay for Pharmacy School

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Scholarships, grants and federal student loans are the best place to start when paying for pharmacy school. Private student loans are also an option and offer competitive interest rates.
Mollie Allen
Planning on earning an MBA? Get to know your federal and private student loan options for covering the cost of business school, including who is eligible, and how much you can borrow.
Mollie Allen
Medical and residency loans help post-graduate medical students pay for board exam fees and costs associated with residency and relocation. Find competitive loans from top lenders.
Elaine Rubin
Graduate students can borrow federal and private student loans. Federal student loans include Direct Unsubsidized Loans and Grad PLUS Loans. Private student loans are also available and may offer more competitive rates.
Edvisors Network
Comparing student loan options for can be difficult. This chart will help you understand the differences between private student loans and PLUS Loans, including options for parents.

Federal Student Loans

Most college students will have to borrow one or more student loans before they graduate, because there aren’t enough government grants to cover all college costs. There are more than $100 billion in new student loans made each year and more than $1 trillion in student loan debt outstanding.

The average student loan debt for a bachelors degree is $36,510 and the average student loan debt for a masters degree is $71,318

It is always best to determine if you have federal or private student loans, and who services them before you start the refinance or consolidation process. To find your federal student loans log into your My Federal Student Aid account with the U.S. Department of Education. For private student loans request your free annual credit report at AnnualCreditReport.com.

Most new private student loans require the borrower to have a creditworthy cosigner. This includes more than 90% of new private student loans to undergraduate students and more than 75% of new private student loans to graduate and professional students. But, what if the student doesn't have a creditworthy cosigner?

There are the obvious expenses you can use your student loans for such as school tuition and fees. However, you can use your student loans to help you cover other education-related costs. Some of those items include:

To qualify for federal, state, and college financial aid for graduate school, you have to submit the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). The FAFSA is required to receive federal and state grants and scholarships, as well as federal student loans, including Perkins Loans, Direct Unsubsidized Loans, and Grad PLUS Loans.